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UK-Iceland Cable on the Global Infrastructure 100 List

A global panel of independent industry experts has identified a subsea electric cable between Iceland and the United Kingdom (UK) as one of the hundred most inspirational and innovative infrastructure projects in the world – many of which are expected to transform the way the world’s populations interact with their cities, governments and environment. This is the first time that an infrastructure project in Iceland is on this list, which is published by KPMG (download the report as pdf here).

KPMG-Global-Infrastructure-100-2014-coverKPMG International’s ‘Infrastructure 100: World Markets Report highlights key trends driving infrastructure investment around the world. In the report, a global panel of industry experts identifies 100 of the world’s most innovative, impactful infrastructure projects. Furthermore, the panel demonstrates how governments are coming together with the private sector to overcome funding constraints in order to finance and build projects that can improve quality of life – both solving immediate needs and planning for future societal demands.

The 2014 report focuses on key trends driving infrastructure investment in four key markets, one of the categories being smaller established markets, which are strong domestic markets open to private finance in infrastructure.

The subsea electric cable between Iceland and the UK is one of 25 projects falling under this market-category. The report describes the project, called IceLink, as an ambitious attempt to connect the power grids of Iceland and the UK. Iceland produces all of its electrical power by the means of renewable energy, such as hydro, geothermal and wind, and has potential well beyond local consumption.

According to KPMG, the total investment in the cable and related production and grid infrastructure in Iceland has been assessed in the range of USD 5 billion. When completed, this clean-tech venture would be the world’s longest subsea power cable, delivering as much as 5 TWh a year of renewable electricity to the UK – at a cost lower than offshore wind in UK territories. KPMG says that UK-based ventures have shown interest in funding the interconnector, while Icelandic power companies will build the power-generating facilities and onshore infrastructure in Iceland

KPMG-Global-Infrastructure-100-2014-enregy-and-resources-list-smallOf all the 100 projects listed in the 2014 KPMG-report, 27 projects are in the sector of energy and natural resources. Besides the IceLink, these projects are for example the Alaska LNG Project, the UK Hinkley Point C Nuclear Power Station, and Russia-China Gas Pipeline.

A total of 25 projects are classified as being in smaller established markets. The IceLink is one of these projects – other projects in this category are for example the Facebook Rapid Deployment Data Center in Luleå in Sweden, the Scandinavian 8 Million City High Speed Rail Link between the capitals of Norway, Sweden and Denmark, and the Rail Baltica, linking Finland, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania with 960 km of railway track. Although many of the projects in this category face challenges regarding scale and investment, KPMG believes there are good possibilities to realize all the projects with increased access of private investment. With IceLink in mind, a perfect and realistic business model might be a private ownership of the cable, while the Icelandic TSO and the main Icelandic power firms would probably be in majority governmental ownership, possibly with private investors as co-owners.